“Love your texture for what it is. I have three different textures going on due to mixed ancestry…”

“I’m an attorney, so I’ve worn my hair in court to mediation. I don’t feel like I’ve been treated any differently because of my hair. Sometimes I wear it straight. Sometimes I wear it fro. It depends on what I’m up to because the fro actually takes more time. It’s a loving self-care process that relaxes me when I’m able to do it, but when I’m not able to do it I can get frustrated with myself. I’m like ‘no, you don’t have the time to put on all of the product and oils that keep it right for the day.’ At night I’ll put on the oil and I’ll feel better, but then I notice that it’s getting a little frizzy so I need to re-wash it.

Love your texture for what it is. I have three different textures going on due to mixed ancestry. The front is longer, the middle is super kinky and the back has looser curls. For me, learning the different textures was frustrating and I didn’t want to own that identity. I was like ‘oh my gosh, my hair. I can’t wear it out like this.’ I would do twists and then I just got annoyed with the time that it took to dry the twists, so I decided that I was going to just wash and fro.”

(Blooming Entrepreneurs) “I had to follow my heart when I decided to loc my hair. It’s my hair, on my head and I haven’t looked back since…”

I’ve been really fortunate to interact with quite a few entrepreneurs who I want to highlight on the blog. Shawna Kaye is a personal branding strategist and digital branding consultant who I met recently while out and about at an event. I had to share her experience as a blooming entrepreneur with natural hair on the blog! You can learn more about Shawna by visiting her website where she has...

“I’ve big chopped three times….”

“I’ve big chopped three times. The first time, I cut all of my hair off to start dreadlocks. I had my dreads for about two years and then I got tired of them. After that experience, I left my hair natural for two months. I was pregnant and experiencing a lot of emotions, so I cut it all off again. We’re going to skip the second time, however. My current and third big chop happened because my hair was damaged. I relaxed it and mainly kept it in a ponytail.

My family is super Afrocentric and they come from the African culture, so I grew up in that type of environment. One day, I just decided ‘no more’. For what? I love my hair short because it feels free. Initially, when I cut my hair for the third time, I was going to continue to grow it out but I’ve been getting my hair cut for two months now. You don’t see many women getting the designs in their hair,  but I like to keep it simple while showing a little individuality. Not too much though.”

(Featured Post) “Wearing my hair natural is making me more self-confident in my identity and firm in my belief that we can be great in our natural state…”

“Wearing my hair natural is making me more self-confident in my identity and firm in my belief that we can be great in our natural state. I identify as a black woman, especially attending a predominately white institution (PWI) like American University. It makes me more strong in my identity because my hair shows that I’m proud of my heritage and that I’m not necessarily trying to assimilate even though...

It’s Friday (TGIF!) and as I prepare wind down for the weekend, what better way to do so then with a podcast?  Back in 2013, I wasn’t aware of the impact that transitioning to natural hair would have on my personal development, self-care and wellness routines. Needless to say, I became engrossed with learning about the best hair care products and routines from my fellow naturalistas on the Internet via...

(Featured Post) “If my hair starts a conversation around what it means to better understand the lived experience of other people…”

Sending this lovely friend of mine lots of love as she travels throughout the Middle East and heads back to live in South Africa! Thank you for your support and for sharing your story. “My evolution to wearing natural hair was very natural in that it was passive. I decided to stop relaxing my hair because I didn’t feel like going to the salon. Over time, I began to notice...

“I’d be at work and people would literally touch my hair throughout the day…”

“I live in London, but I’ve worked in other European countries where people would ask to randomly touch my hair. I’d be at work and people would literally touch my hair throughout the day, so I know that I would be the talk of the day if I wore my hair out like I’m wearing it now.  

I’ve been natural for two years. One day I was having a hard time and needed a change, so I cut it off myself. It was very liberating. It was the first time I experienced having short hair which took a little while for me to embrace because in our community hair is everything. A lot of women in London have natural hair, but they choose to wear protective styles because it appears more acceptable on the job. I often wear protective styles myself when I’m back home. Things are slowly changing, however. Our main pharmacy chain which is similar to CVS started selling more products for Afro-textured hair about three years ago. A lot of people get their natural hair products from the US, so that’s important.”

 

 

“When I started focusing on living a more holistic lifestyle, I stopped relaxing my hair…”

“When I started focusing on living a more holistic lifestyle, I stopped relaxing my hair. I transitioned to natural in 2009 and started growing it out in 2016. Having my daughter earlier this year also influenced my decision to let my hair grow out more. Initially, I wanted to loc my hair, but I always kept it cut short until now.”

“Both of my parents are health nuts, so I’ve been natural all my life…”

“You caught me while I was sitting here with my eyes closed in the park enjoying the warmth of the sun before the weather gets too cold.

Both of my parents are health nuts, so I’ve been natural all my life. Being natural hasn’t really impacted the way that I live because it’s really the only lifestyle that I know. If having natural hair inspires more women of color to live a healthy and organic lifestyle then that’s definitely a good thing.”

 

“I recognized that I needed a change, so I started snipping my hair and combing it out..”

“I cut my locs because my birthday was a little over a week ago and I just turned 34. I’m going through a time of transition with a lot of different things, including my personal and professional life. I’m a clinical social worker and a therapist working primarily in healthcare with a network that focuses on undocumented  black immigrants. I had my locs for about two years. I recognized that...