(Blooming Entrepreneurs) “We as black women go through so much stuff when it comes to our hair. Most of us didn’t learn about the true and glorious potential of our hair growing up…”

Kia Marie has an amazing YouTube Channel (Hairitage93) that focuses on natural care, beauty and wellness. To learn more AND support, visit her channel here! “I straightened my hair for the first time in two years. The last time I straightened it, I had to cut off so much damage which was disappointing because I had been natural for almost four years. A lot of people knew me for having...

“I work for a member of Congress who has sister-locks, so I knew that I wouldn’t receive push back for wearing my hair natural in the workplace…”

“I’ve been natural for ten years. I was motivated to go natural because I got a bad perm and when I went to college everyone was natural. Honestly, it was something that I didn’t know was a possibility but I tried it out and stuck with it. I was spending so much money trying to keep my hair straightened that wearing it natural was the most efficient way. I don’t miss waiting in the hair salon. Even when I do go to the salon, I don’t go on a Saturday because I realized that I could not continue to give my life over to a random salon where I’m not paying bills.

I work for a member of Congress who has sister-locks, so I knew that I wouldn’t receive push back for wearing my hair natural in the workplace. Prior to working for the congresswoman, I had internships in corporate environments and if someone said anything about my hair they never said it to my face. I went to college in Philly, so I saw a lot of judges with Afros and dreadlocks. The precedent was a little higher there compared to where I’m originally from down south. A lot of family members still don’t really get it, so you just have to be comfortable with yourself.”

“My aunt told me that she couldn’t comb through my hair anymore because my natural hair was growing out and for her to treat my hair better she was going to chop off all of the relaxed hair…”

“My aunt told me that she couldn’t comb through my hair anymore because my natural hair was growing out and for her to treat my hair better she was going to chop off all of the relaxed hair. It took some convincing, but I knew that I couldn’t do it anymore after I saw her struggling to comb through the relaxed hair so I told her to chop it off. That was in December 2014.

My aunt eventually ended up relaxing her and her daughters hair again. I don’t want to relax my hair, however. I just can’t maintain it anymore. I’ll be honest, the maintenance is a pain but I can’t put a relaxer back in my hair. It’s a little annoying to have to twist my hair every night, but I like it. I really enjoy it. I spent the last six to eight months with my hair in braids and twists because the humidity in Florida was terrible.”

2017 represented a phenomenal year of personal development and growth. I feel that something must have been in the air because I’ve noticed that quite a few people had a similar experience. Can you relate? If so, definitely let me know. Since I listen to quite a few (PHENOMENAL) podcasts that are hosted by black women and focus on a wide range of topics, I have a never-ending list of...

(Blooming Entrepreneurs) “I thought that it would be a phase that I would quickly get over, but now I realize that I wouldn’t choose to wear my hair any other way…”

Learn more about JohariMade jams and jellies by visiting here website. “I’ve been natural since I started my locs in 2008. I was very anti-locs for a long time, but my daughter was about eight years old when I let her start loc’ing her hair– she even did a book report about it. Initially, I couldn’t imagine loc’ing my hair because I could only think of Whoopi Goldberg’s loc style, but...

“Wanting to not put chemicals in my hair or use harsh things that are not good for me, all started with the transition to natural…”

“I transitioned when I was in ninth grade, so I was a little bit ahead of the curve. At that time, not a lot of people were letting their big curly hair go, so it was kind of a struggle going through school. It was definitely worth it in the long run, however.

Wanting to not put chemicals in my hair or use harsh things that are not good for me, all started with the transition to natural. The transition also impacted my skincare routine when I decided to use all natural products. I really pay attention to all of the ingredients in the food that I eat ensuring that I focus on food that’s more natural and clean, so it really has became a lifestyle for me.”

“I’ve big chopped three times….”

“I’ve big chopped three times. The first time, I cut all of my hair off to start dreadlocks. I had my dreads for about two years and then I got tired of them. After that experience, I left my hair natural for two months. I was pregnant and experiencing a lot of emotions, so I cut it all off again. We’re going to skip the second time, however. My current and third big chop happened because my hair was damaged. I relaxed it and mainly kept it in a ponytail.

My family is super Afrocentric and they come from the African culture, so I grew up in that type of environment. One day, I just decided ‘no more’. For what? I love my hair short because it feels free. Initially, when I cut my hair for the third time, I was going to continue to grow it out but I’ve been getting my hair cut for two months now. You don’t see many women getting the designs in their hair,  but I like to keep it simple while showing a little individuality. Not too much though.”

(Featured Post) “Wearing my hair natural is making me more self-confident in my identity and firm in my belief that we can be great in our natural state…”

“Wearing my hair natural is making me more self-confident in my identity and firm in my belief that we can be great in our natural state. I identify as a black woman, especially attending a predominately white institution (PWI) like American University. It makes me more strong in my identity because my hair shows that I’m proud of my heritage and that I’m not necessarily trying to assimilate even though...

“When I started focusing on living a more holistic lifestyle, I stopped relaxing my hair…”

“When I started focusing on living a more holistic lifestyle, I stopped relaxing my hair. I transitioned to natural in 2009 and started growing it out in 2016. Having my daughter earlier this year also influenced my decision to let my hair grow out more. Initially, I wanted to loc my hair, but I always kept it cut short until now.”

“Both of my parents are health nuts, so I’ve been natural all my life…”

“You caught me while I was sitting here with my eyes closed in the park enjoying the warmth of the sun before the weather gets too cold.

Both of my parents are health nuts, so I’ve been natural all my life. Being natural hasn’t really impacted the way that I live because it’s really the only lifestyle that I know. If having natural hair inspires more women of color to live a healthy and organic lifestyle then that’s definitely a good thing.”